In an Ex-Googler’s Novel, Silicon Valley Runs on Male Ego

The Big Disruption, a satirical novel written by Jessica Powell, Google’s former head of communications, is set inside the lush and bountiful Silicon Valley headquarters of Anahata, a massive, 10-year-old tech giant in love with its own mythology about open-door board meetings and profound yet “napkin-able” ideas. Visionary CEO Bobby Bonilo deploys the company’s vast resources and intellectual firepower mainly to play catch-up with Galt, the hottest startup in the Valley, famous for creating apps and tools capable of “reducing all thought and opinion to easily shareable, bite-sized chunks.” The parallel to Powell’s real life is obvious. Anahata began as a search engine that couldn’t seem to get social networking right. The company takes a literal shot at the moon. …

Street battle: the activists fighting to save their neighbourhood from the tech giants

Facebook, Google and Amazon have not just colonised the internet: their hubs, campuses and offices are taking over huge sections of cities around the world. But campaigners from New York to Toronto and Berlin are fighting back Its a challenge out here. The way the tech companies are building and increasing their size is just pricing people out. Families who have been here for generations cant afford to be here any more. Theyre being pushed off into rural areas anywhere from an hour to two and a half hours away. JT Faraji is a 43-year-old artist who lives with his family in East Palo Alto, the northern California city on the edge of Silicon Valley. Just a stones throw away, …

Europe’s New Copyright Law Could Be Bad for Memes

You may soon see fewer memes online, especially if you live in the European Union. On Tuesday, the European Parliament passed a directive to overhaul copyright law in the European Union and put more pressure on the likes of Google, Facebook, and Instagram to keep copyrighted material like photos and videos off their platforms. Now it's up to each member country to write laws based on the directive. The laws will apply only in the EU, but it's possible that companies will try to comply with the directive globally, just as some companies, including Microsoft, say they are applying the EU privacy regulations outside of Europe. The most controversial part of the copyright directive makes platforms like Google and Facebook …

Googles Emma Haruka Iwao breaks Pi world record

The European Commission fined Google $1.7 billion for illegal ad practices that stifled its rivals from competing in the online advertising market.Image: Thierry Monasse/Getty Images The EU is making Google pay for its anti-competitive practices. On Wednesday, the European Commission ordered Google to pay a huge €1.49 billion antitrust fine (roughly $1.7 billion USD) for “abusive practices in online advertising.” The Commission determined that Google had engaged in illegal conduct to “cement its dominant market position” with its Adsense program, which had a market share of more than 70 percent from 2006 to 2016 in Europe. Hundreds of Google’s advertising agreements with major websites were reviewed by the commission, which discovered numerous restrictive clauses that blocked the company’s advertising rivals …

The EU Hits Google With a Third Billion-Dollar Fine. So What?

European officials Wednesday fined Google €1.49 billion ($1.7 billion) for more than a decade of abusive practices in how it brokered online ads for other websites like newspapers, blogs, and travel aggregators. This is the third billion-dollar antitrust penalty levied against Google by the European Commission, which has fined the company more than $9 billion for anticompetitive practices since 2017. Some critics were quick to point out that the fines don’t seem to have eroded Google’s dominance. But the reaction also shows how much the debate around antitrust has intensified in just a few years, from fear that enforcement would stifle innovation to concern that even massive fines provide an insufficient check on dominant tech giants. As part of Commissioner …

This Big Facebook Critic Fears Techs Business Model

Longtime Silicon Valley investor Roger McNamee met Mark Zuckerberg in 2006, when the Facebook CEO was just 22 and his two-year-old company still only catered to university students. Facebook was young, but McNamee was already convinced it was “the next big thing,” he told WIRED editor in chief Nicholas Thompson on Sunday during a keynote conversation at SXSW 2019 in Austin. “The thing that had killed every attempt at social apps before that [was] essentially that the ability to be anonymous allowed trolls to take over. I was convinced that Mark’s requirement of authenticated identity was literally the holy grail, it was the thing that was going to unlock this opportunity.” There was no investment opportunity at the time; McNamee …

Steve Irwin honoured with a Google Doodle on his birthday

Holding a crocodile, nothing less.Image: Google On Friday, the late Steve Irwin would’ve turned 57. To commemorate the late animal conservationist and TV personality, who passed away in 2006, Google will unveil a Doodle in his honour. SEE ALSO: Test your internet prowess with Google’s phishing quiz The main Doodle features Steve holding on to a crocodile, as he was remembered for. It’s animated, so when users click through, there’s more images with the family and other animals. “Today’s Google Doodle acknowledges the life and achievements of my husband Steve Irwin, whose efforts to protect wildlife and wild places have been recognised as the most extensive of any conservationist,” Terri Irwin, the wife of Steve, wrote in a blog post. …